The Yawpers Boy in a Well

Album Review by Rustyn Clark

The Yawpers slug your mug, sit your ass down, put a stiff drink in your hand, then kick the chair out from under you with their latest release, Boy in a Well. The Denver-based trio draws on the influences of Elvis, Springsteen, Aerosmith and their own lives to create a unique flavor of in-your-face angst-rock. They masterfully unite the grounded sounds of gravelly southern blues harmony, the we-don’t-give-a-shit grunge-like guitar distortion, and an unexpectedly tender indie-folk lyricism. Boasting a sound all their own, they weave a dubious tale keeping their fans on their toes from first note to last.

 

Boy in a Well is a grislier and more maniacally forsaken narrative than The Yawpers’ previous album, American Man.  Where American Man wanted to reconcile the perception of American prosperity with the latest transmutations degrading the everyman’s daily routine in the US, Boy in a Well asks an altogether different question. Their most recent dozen-track record takes us a hundred years back in time and across the Atlantic to blur the lines of rectitude and wanton capriciousness in France during World War I.

 

Harkening back to literary muses (The Yawpers take their name from a Walt Whitman poem), Boy in a Well is strongly reminiscent of a Shakespearean tragedy. Any moment of humor or joy is sharply punctuated by a dark and dirty deed made more salient by frontman and lead-vocalist, Nate Cook’s voice.

 

Bouncing between forlorn woe and foot-tapping, face-slapping, frenzied lyrics, The Yawpers’ latest release tells a disconsolate story of one woman’s terrible choices. As the world begins changing history with the Great War, Boy in a Well tells the story of a mother pitching her unwanted newborn into a well. Cook’s vocals carry the story from the pinnacle of profuse elation to the profundity of fatalistic emotion, while Jesse Parmet’s ethereal melodies and Noah Shomberg’s rhythms set each song against its own backdrop.

 

The album chronicles an account that initially starts on a potentially positive note, but descends shockingly quickly into tribulation before they crank it up to 11. Offering such sharp contrast in a single album is reason enough to make Boy in a Well stand out from its peers.  Ranging from almost hopeful tracks like, ”A Visitor is Welcomed,” to songs stretched thin in their distress such as “No Going Back,” The Yawpers’ capable story-telling demands attention.

 

The only blemish this album is guilty of presenting is a stylistic choice of the vocals. Though each track hits with the full force of the soul you can’t help but feel went into each, it can leave you wanting more. The real shame is that what you want more of is the story – and worse yet, it’s there!  You just can’t hear it. Some of the lyrics, while they sound great, can be difficult to understand. Normally, this isn’t such a noticeable issue, but when paired with the comic book (illustrated by J.D. Wilkes) you really miss clarity in the lyrics.

 

Despite that minor grievance, you still owe yourself a favor: experience the album along with the accompanying comic book of the same title, Boy in a Well. J.D Wilkes’ artistic style compliments The Yawpers’ gritty sound to leave a complete and genuine story you’ll want to your friends (but maybe not family) to experience. The best part of what The Yawpers do with this album’s story is their take on a classic literary trope, it has a twist at the end as questionable as it is grotesque.

 

If you’re just now hearing about The Yawpers, you’ve got some catching up to do, amigo. Cook’s cleverly written lyrics in “Room with a View” make surprising, yet mournful sense when paired with the comic: “What is future what is past? / Every cry returns to him / In a room with an echo, room with one wall and a hunger to consume them all / In a room with a view.”

 

The Yawpers’ latest, Boy in a Well, is out on August 18 and offers 12 tracks of Poe-worthy story-telling through guilty-pleasure southern grunge folk-indie goodness.

The Yawpers Boy in a Well

Album Review by Rustyn Clark

The Yawpers slug your mug, sit your ass down, put a stiff drink in your hand, then kick the chair out from under you with their latest release, Boy in a Well. The Denver-based trio draws on the influences of Elvis, Springsteen, Aerosmith and their own lives to create a unique flavor of in-your-face angst-rock. They masterfully unite the grounded sounds of gravelly southern blues harmony, the we-don’t-give-a-shit grunge-like guitar distortion, and an unexpectedly tender indie-folk lyricism. Boasting a sound all their own, they weave a dubious tale keeping their fans on their toes from first note to last.

 

Boy in a Well is a grislier and more maniacally forsaken narrative than The Yawpers’ previous album, American Man.  Where American Man wanted to reconcile the perception of American prosperity with the latest transmutations degrading the everyman’s daily routine in the US, Boy in a Well asks an altogether different question. Their most recent dozen-track record takes us a hundred years back in time and across the Atlantic to blur the lines of rectitude and wanton capriciousness in France during World War I.

 

Harkening back to literary muses (The Yawpers take their name from a Walt Whitman poem), Boy in a Well is strongly reminiscent of a Shakespearean tragedy. Any moment of humor or joy is sharply punctuated by a dark and dirty deed made more salient by frontman and lead-vocalist, Nate Cook’s voice.

 

Bouncing between forlorn woe and foot-tapping, face-slapping, frenzied lyrics, The Yawpers’ latest release tells a disconsolate story of one woman’s terrible choices. As the world begins changing history with the Great War, Boy in a Well tells the story of a mother pitching her unwanted newborn into a well. Cook’s vocals carry the story from the pinnacle of profuse elation to the profundity of fatalistic emotion, while Jesse Parmet’s ethereal melodies and Noah Shomberg’s rhythms set each song against its own backdrop.

 

The album chronicles an account that initially starts on a potentially positive note, but descends shockingly quickly into tribulation before they crank it up to 11. Offering such sharp contrast in a single album is reason enough to make Boy in a Well stand out from its peers.  Ranging from almost hopeful tracks like, ”A Visitor is Welcomed,” to songs stretched thin in their distress such as “No Going Back,” The Yawpers’ capable story-telling demands attention.

 

The only blemish this album is guilty of presenting is a stylistic choice of the vocals. Though each track hits with the full force of the soul you can’t help but feel went into each, it can leave you wanting more. The real shame is that what you want more of is the story – and worse yet, it’s there!  You just can’t hear it. Some of the lyrics, while they sound great, can be difficult to understand. Normally, this isn’t such a noticeable issue, but when paired with the comic book (illustrated by J.D. Wilkes) you really miss clarity in the lyrics.

 

Despite that minor grievance, you still owe yourself a favor: experience the album along with the accompanying comic book of the same title, Boy in a Well. J.D Wilkes’ artistic style compliments The Yawpers’ gritty sound to leave a complete and genuine story you’ll want to your friends (but maybe not family) to experience. The best part of what The Yawpers do with this album’s story is their take on a classic literary trope, it has a twist at the end as questionable as it is grotesque.

 

If you’re just now hearing about The Yawpers, you’ve got some catching up to do, amigo. Cook’s cleverly written lyrics in “Room with a View” make surprising, yet mournful sense when paired with the comic: “What is future what is past? / Every cry returns to him / In a room with an echo, room with one wall and a hunger to consume them all / In a room with a view.”

 

The Yawpers’ latest, Boy in a Well, is out on August 18 and offers 12 tracks of Poe-worthy story-telling through guilty-pleasure southern grunge folk-indie goodness.

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon

Copyright 2020 © Dive In Media, LLC.  All Rights Reserved